Announcing the 2015-2016 China Urbanization Research Proposal Competition

With support from the Dean’s Office, College of Arts & Sciences and the Provost’s Office, the Program on Chinese Cities (PCC) is pleased to solicit applications for its China Urbanization Research Proposal Competition. The Program on Chinese Cities Research Proposal Competition is designed to encourage faculty members at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to conduct research on Chinese cities. Continue reading

Laura Lopez-Sanders, CURS 2015-16 Scholar-in-Residence

Laura Lopez-Sanders

The Center for Urban & Regional Studies is pleased to announce that Dr. Laura Lopez-Sanders from the Department of Sociology is our Scholar-in-Residence for 2015-16. Dr. Lopez-Sanders will use this opportunity to develop a proposal for research on the unintended consequences of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the ACA) on immigrant integration in new destinations. Continue reading

N&O Op-Ed by CURS Faculty Fellow Looks at Impact of Short-Term Rentals on Cities

Mai Thi Nguyen

Mai Thi Nguyen / UNC College

April 16, 2015

CURS faculty fellow and associate professor of city and regional planning Mai Thi Nguyen is the author of an opinion piece in the News and Observer today about regulation of short-term rental web companies like AirBnB.

Read the extended version of the piece first published here.

 

Two, One, or No Local Food Movement(s) in North Carolina? The Significance of Local Activism in the Current Conjuncture

April 24, 2015

Don Nonini presents  research with colleague Dorothy Holland (not pictured) at Hickerson House.

Don Nonini presents research with colleague Dorothy Holland (not pictured) at Hickerson House.

In a presentation today called “Two, One, or No Local Food Movement(s) in North Carolina? The Significance of Local Activism in the Current Conjuncture,” Don Nonini and Dorothy Holland, both of the UNC Department of Anthropology, presented their findings from a multi-sited ethnographic study of local food activism in four regions of North Carolina. After describing the objectives, methodology, and the rationale for four different sites, they summarized their broad finding: there are major differences between food security and sustainable agriculture activisms, and neither one constitutes a social movement.

Continue reading