Public Housing residents support smoking ban, according to CURS researchers

HUD is currently accepting comments on a proposed smoking ban in public housing. The new rule would extend a current ban that includes public areas and administrative offices to residents’ homes. In HUD’s press release, Secretary Castro stated that the smoking ban will “protect public housing residents from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke.”

Earlier this year, the Center for Urban and Regional Studies asked Charlotte Housing Authority (CHA) public housing residents about their health, how often they smoke, and whether they would support a ban within public housing. These questions were part of a larger survey conducted for the CHA to evaluate its Moving Forward (Moving to Work) program. The survey of 519 residents found alarming rates of chronic diseases—such as asthma, hypertension and depression—and of daily smoking rates. Continue reading

CURS to help evaluate HUD’s Jobs Plus Pilot Program

The Center for Urban and Regional Studies (CURS) has been selected as part of a team of researchers to evaluate the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Jobs Plus Pilot Program. CURS joins lead organization MDRC and partner organization National Initiative for Mixed-Income Communities at Case Western Reserve University to assess Job Plus as it is implemented in nine cities. Continue reading

Fall 2015 Newsletter

Fall 2015 newsletterAre work requirements in public housing helping residents move toward self-sufficiency? A new CURS study, the first of its kind, looks at the efficacy of the policy. Read about it in the CURS Fall 2015 newsletter. Also, how impulsivity, which can be an impediment to financial health, can also be leveraged as a way to put away funds for the future. Click here!

CURS Public Housing Work Requirements Research Featured on NLIHC’s “Must Reads” List

October 5, 2015

Must-ReadsThe National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) placed a recently released Center for Urban and Regional Studies research report entitled Work Requirements in Public Housing: Impacts on Tenant Employment and Evictions on its “Must Reads” list today. NLICH also featured the research on its website.

The study is the first analysis of the impacts of a work requirement for residents in public housing developments. The research examines a work requirement implemented by the Charlotte Housing Authority (CHA) through its Moving to Work participation.

Click here more information on this research.

 

 

NAHRO Monitor Features Two CURS Public Housing Research Studies

September 30, 2015

NAHRO Monitor Sept 30 2015 coverThe NAHRO Monitor, a twice-monthly update sent to the 22,000 members of the The National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials, featured two CURS research studies in its recent issue. The front page article “Center for Urban and Regional Studies Publishes Report on Moving to Work” outlines the results CURS’ assessment of the Charlotte Housing Authority’s (CHA) efforts to implement the Moving to Work (MTW) program entitled Moving Forward (MF).

The Monitor also highlighted Work Requirements in Public Housing: Impacts on Tenant Employment and Evictions, a report released by the Center earlier this month evaluating the CHA’s work requirement policy, comparing the employment and eviction rates between those subject to the work requirement and a comparison group not subject to the policy.

Read the articles here.

Learn about the NAHRO Monitor and the work of NAHRO.

How the Reemergence of Manufacturing Can Benefit Historic Small Towns: A Mississippi Case Study

A Regional Land UseTransportation Decision Support Tool for MississippiWhen a new industry comes to town, the financial investment and revitalization that comes with it can be a boon to local economies and residents. But rural regions with deep roots in agriculture and manufacturing may encounter challenges in balancing the character and history of their communities with the development needs of new industry—especially if that new industry is high-tech. The people of Mississippi Hills National Heritage Area, where a new Toyota plant recently opened, face such a challenge.

In a report entitled A Regional Land Use-Transportation Decision Support Tool for Mississippi, Brian Morton, CURS Senior Research Associate and principal investigator of the study, outlines two starkly different development futures for the Mississippi Hills National Heritage Area. One projects rapid expansion of the towns of Tupelo and New Albany, both near the plant, which eclipse the region’s smaller towns. The second development pattern envisions more even growth among the regions larger towns: Houston, Pontotoc, New Albany, and Tupelo.

Continue reading

New Research on Public Housing Work Requirements and their Impacts on Tenant Employment and Evictions

Tarlton Hills is one of five public housing developments where the Charlotte Housing Authority has implemented a work requirement with on-site case management for residents.

Tarlton Hills is one of five public housing developments where the Charlotte Housing Authority has implemented a work requirement with on-site case management for residents.

September 14, 2015

Public housing authorities have always faced a tension: to provide safe, stable housing to our most vulnerable families while also trying to move them off public housing assistance. The use of work requirements as a means to increase employment among public housing residents is currently being implemented by eight housing authorities participating in HUD’s Moving to Work demonstration program (MTW). However, until now, there has been no rigorous evaluation of the impacts of these policies on tenants. Continue reading

CURS Releases New Report on Moving to Work Program

As Congress continues to debate the future of Moving to Work, many policy-makers and advocates clamor for details about the program’s effectiveness. Approaching its 20th year of existence, Moving to Work (MTW) is a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) demonstration program that provides participating housing authorities the flexibility to explore innovative policies. While 39 public housing authorities are currently participating in MTW, Congress is considering significantly expanding and/or reforming the program. Continue reading