Are Chinese households becoming more resilient to climate change? Large-sample evidence from the China Health and Nutrition Survey

Clark Gray

Clark Gray

The UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies presents:

A Brown Bag Lunch Seminar by Clark Gray, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Geography, UNC-Chapel Hill

Reading Room, New East
Friday, March 3, 2017, 12:30-1:45 PM

Dr. Gray will present ongoing research with collaborators on the consequences of climate variability for human health and internal migration in China. This work reveals that heat stress can contribute to undernutrition and displace migrants, but that these effects have declined over time as China has developed and urbanized. The implications of these results for climate adaptation will be discussed.

http://www.josefschulz.de/

Photo: Josef Schulz http://www.josefschulz.de/

Working with In-country Chinese Migrant and Low Income Families: Creating and Sustaining Partnerships on the Other Side of the Earth

Mimi Chapman

Mimi Chapman

The UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies presents:

A Brown Bag Lunch Seminar by Mimi Chapman, Ph.D.
Professor, UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work

Reading Room, New East
Friday, February 24, 2017, 12:30-1:45 PM
Postponed until a later date. Please check back for an update.
Free

Since 2010, Professor Mimi Chapman of the UNC School of Social Work and Professor Meihua Zhu of the East China University of Science and Technology have been working together to understand and address the needs of in-country migrant families and low income families in Shanghai, China. Frequent policy changes in China have made this work challenging and ever-evolving. This talk will describe their work thus far, discuss findings, and plans for future development.

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Practice of Urban Revival in Shanghai, China

CURS, the Department of City and Regional Planning, and the Program on Chinese Cities presents:

Practice of Urban Revival in Shanghai, China

Gu XiaokunA Brown Bag Lunch Seminar by Gu Xiaokun, Visiting Scholar at the Center for Urban & Regional Studies.

Reading Room, New East
Thursday, February 2, 2017, 12:30-1:45PM

Shanghai has a long history of urban revival, dating back to the 19th century. As the first city in China committed to limiting the total amount of land allocated for construction, Shanghai plays a critical role in informing urban planning and development in China. In her presentation, Dr. Gu will discuss the history of urban revival in Shanghai, highlight several case studies, outline the main policy tools used, and identify new trends in urban revival since 2015.

Biography: Gu Xiaokun is a visiting scholar at the Center for Urban and Regional Studies. She received her Ph.D. at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences. She was an associate professor at the School of Urban and Regional Planning in Zhejiang Gongshang University from 2008 to 2014. Currently, she is an associate researcher at the Institute of New Rural Development in Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Dr. Gu’s research interests including urban and rural planning, land use policy and rural development, and urban revival.

Professor Zhendong Luo to Give Talk on New Urbanization in China

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Zhendong Luo, an associate professor at Nanjing University and a visiting scholar at CURS’ Program on Chinese Cities, will give a talk entitled “New Urbanization in China from the Bottom Up: The Characteristic Mechanisms & Trends of Rural Urbanization Driven by E-Commerce.” He will speak from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in New East‘s Reading Room this Thursday, April 7. The talk is free, and light refreshments will be served.

Rural urbanization driven by e-commerce is a relatively new process in China. This process is systematically restructuring rural economic, social, and spatial environments, influencing the non-agricultural transformation of employment and sparking comprehensive modernization of country life and intensive urbanization of rural land. The advantages of rural areas—including low-cost entrepreneurial environments, specialty agricultural products, and local non-agricultural industry—and advances in e-commerce allow rural areas to overcome geographic constraints and join the national and global economy.

In his talk, Professor Luo will discuss these changes and how the importance of the capital and knowledge heading to the countryside help support rural sustainable development. For more information, please contact Todd Owen, CURS’ Associate Director, at towen@email.unc.edu.

CURS to participate in #TalkHousing Twitter talk with How Housing Matters

How Housing Matters #TalkHousing

CURS Director and Boshamer Distinguished Professor of City & Regional Planning Bill Rohe will participate in a #TalkHousing Twitter talk with other experts on the impacts of work requirements on employment and eviction among public housing residents. The talk will be hosted by How Housing Matters on Friday, January 15 from 1-2p.m. ET. To access the chat, follow the hashtag or check the @Housing360 timeline. Professor Rohe will be participating from CURS’ Twitter handle, @UNCCURS.

How Housing Matters is run by Urban Land Institute Terwilliger Center for Housing and supported by the MacArthur Foundation.

Two, One, or No Local Food Movement(s) in North Carolina? The Significance of Local Activism in the Current Conjuncture

April 24, 2015

Don Nonini presents  research with colleague Dorothy Holland (not pictured) at Hickerson House.

Don Nonini presents research with colleague Dorothy Holland (not pictured) at Hickerson House.

In a presentation today called “Two, One, or No Local Food Movement(s) in North Carolina? The Significance of Local Activism in the Current Conjuncture,” Don Nonini and Dorothy Holland, both of the UNC Department of Anthropology, presented their findings from a multi-sited ethnographic study of local food activism in four regions of North Carolina. After describing the objectives, methodology, and the rationale for four different sites, they summarized their broad finding: there are major differences between food security and sustainable agriculture activisms, and neither one constitutes a social movement.

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Confronting the Dark Side of “Smart Cities”

April 8, 2015

Confronting the Dark Side of “Smart Cities”

Torin Monahan talks with attendees after his presentation at Hickerson House on April 8, 2015.

Torin Monahan talks with attendees after his presentation at Hickerson House on April 8, 2015.

Torin Monahan, Associate Professor of Communication Studies and
2014-2015 Scholar-in-Residence at the Center for Urban and Regional Studies

Under the banner of “smart cities,” regional governments around the world are embracing sensing and networking technologies in hopes of solving a wide range of urban problems. Rather than view smart-city developments as neutral, it is important to probe their underlying politics and ask what kinds of worlds are being created in the name of efficiency, economic growth or security.

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