A Tale of Two States: White-Collar Jobs

U2P0

In part three of the five-part Urban 2 Point 0 series, CURS Researcher Michael Webb looks at white-collar jobs, specifically finance and professional services – which includes management, research and engineering. These industries have driven job growth in both North Carolina and the entire U.S. over the past decades. White-collar jobs tend to concentrate in large cities, and North Carolina is no different – with Charlotte serving as a major financial center and Raleigh as a hub of research and technology. Read the blog here.

 

Urban 2 Point 0 Looks at Job Growth in NC

urban2-0In a new series, Urban 2 Point 0 will look at how the geography of jobs across the state has shifted since 1990, both overall and for specific industries. The first post of this series examines total private-sector job changes between 1990 and 2015, and in the upcoming weeks we’ll examine how jobs have changed across specific industries.

North Carolina is one of the fastest-growing states in the U.S. It has added nearly 750,000 private-sector jobs since 1990, and its population recently eclipsed the 10 million mark. This job growth hasn’t touched all parts of the state, though: half of it has occurred in only two counties, and over one-third of the state’s counties have actually lost jobs over the past 25 years.

Urban 2 Point 0 focuses on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, with easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.

Urban 2 Point 0 Examines the Triad

urban2-0In the final post of the Urban 2 Point 0 series on transportation affordability across North Carolina’s three largest metro areas, we look at the Triad region. As we’ve seen in the Triangle and Charlotte, the Triad’s sprawling nature means that many low-income residents spend a large portion of their income on transportation.

This series of posts examined the issue of mixed-income neighborhoods and income inequality in North Carolina’s three largest metro areas: Charlotte, the Triangle (Raleigh-Durham), and the Triad (Greensboro and Winston-Salem). We’ll also publish posts on affordable housing demand, how cities have recovered from the Great Recession, how high-tech industries have disbursed throughout the state, and how demographics can predict the 2016 primary election results.

Urban 2 Point 0 focuses on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, with easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.

CURS Launches Blog, Urban 2 Point 0

urban2-0CURS is thrilled to announce the launch of our new blog, Urban 2 Point 0. Focusing on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, Urban 2 Point 0 presents easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Our first series of posts examines the issue of mixed-income neighborhoods and income inequality in North Carolina’s three largest metro areas: Charlotte, the Triangle (Raleigh-Durham), and the Triad (Greensboro and Winston-Salem). We’ll also publish posts on affordable housing demand, how cities have recovered from the Great Recession, how high-tech industries have disbursed throughout the state, and how demographics can predict the 2016 primary election results.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.