Better Cities, Better Growth: Lessons for India’s Urban Opportunity

Better Cities, Better GrowthIndia is experiencing an urban transformation with its urban population reaching 420 million in 2015 (33 percent of total). This is expected to nearly double by 2050 to 800 million, with close to 400 million additional people living in towns and cities by 2050 (50 percent of total). By 2031, 75 percent of India’s national income is expected to come from cities and a majority of new jobs will be created in urban areas.

“Given the rapidity of change and long-lived nature of urban form and infrastructure, the decisions that India’s policy makers make in the next five to fifteen years will lock in its urban pathway for decades to come,” said CURS Faculty Fellow Meenu Tewari, associate professor, Department of City and Regional Planning at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “There are real choices to be made.”

Global evidence, gathered in a year-long effort by a team led by Tewari, suggests that an extensive, “sprawled” model of urban growth—with cities oriented around the private vehicle rather than people—can have significant economic, social and environmental costs which undermine prosperity. On the other hand, more compact, connected and coordinated cities can be more productive, socially-inclusive, resilient, cleaner and safer, unleashing the benefits of urban agglomeration.

Meenu Tewari

Meenu Tewari

A new synthesis report by Tewari for the India New Climate Economy Partnership focuses on how India can aim to foster a better urbanization — one that promotes more rapid economic transformation, improves the quality of life of city dwellers and curbs the potential harmful spillovers of urbanization, such as congestion, wasteful energy use and unwanted pollution.

The report draws on an innovative blend of nighttime lights (satellite) data and census, environmental and economic data to paint a picture of recent trends in India’s urbanization and the relationships that exist in Indian cities between types of urban expansion and transport connectivity, and economic performance. It looks at the potential nationwide costs of a “sprawled” model of urbanization, as well as noting some of the current policies and institutional conditions that create incentives for such a model of urbanization. Using case studies of four Indian cities—Bangalore, Indore, Pune and Surat—the report delves more deeply into how this model of urban growth might exacerbate key deficits in basic urban services. It concludes by suggesting policy recommendations to accelerate a better form of urbanization.

Chokepoints: Circulation and Regulation in India’s Siliguri Corridor

India's Chicken NeckKnown as the Chicken Neck, the Siliguri Corridor is a precarious sliver of territory connecting India’s ‘mainland’ to its Northeast. Flanked by international borders, the Corridor funnels a myriad of goods and bodies between Nepal, China, Bhutan, Bangladesh, India and onward to Myanmar and Southeast Asia.

It is a zone of intense traffic and a critical chokepoint of South Asia. The immense volume of resources and people moving through the Corridor puts enormous strain on its infrastructure, not to mention those charged with securing and governing this unruly space. The Chicken Neck remains interwoven with smuggling, human trafficking, and clandestine activities – all of which can easily hide within its chaotic traffic. Traffic has accordingly become the operative condition of the Corridor’s (dys)function.

CURS Faculty Fellow Townsend Middleton, assistant professor of anthropology, spent the summer of 2016 working ethnographically with customs agents, anti-human traffickers, logistics experts and truck drivers in order to understand the cat-and-mouse interplays of circulation and regulation that shape life in this transit zone.

Chokepoint TrucksThis fieldwork by Middleton and his partners is part of an ongoing National Science Foundation-funded, CURS-supported, collaborative research project examining chokepoints around the world. Work sites include:

  • The Panama Canal: a century-old chokepoint of Atlantic-Pacific shipping and emerging global logistics hub. (with Ashley Carse, human and organizational development, Vanderbilt University)
  • India’s Siliguri Corridor (a.k.a. the “Chicken Neck”): a vital geopolitical connector of India and South Asia to China and Southeast Asia.
  • The Bab-el-Mandeb Strait: a critical shipping lane between the Arabian Peninsula and the Horn of Africa, connecting the Red Sea to the Indian Ocean. (with Jatin Dua, anthropology, University of Michigan)
  • Ecuador’s Esmeraldas Refinery: a processing facility where oil from Amazonian oilfields is piped, refined, and exported for global maritime trade. (with CURS Faculty Fellow Gabriela Valdivia, geography, UNC-Chapel Hill)
  • Russia’s Roki Tunnel: a passageway of arms, bodies, and nuclear matter through the Caucasus (with Elizabeth Cullen Dunn, geography, Indiana University)
  • The Sundarbans: a network of chokepoints straddling the India-Bangladesh border and a critical zone of climatological crisis. (with Jason Cons, public affairs, UT Austin)
Townsend Middleton

Townsend Middleton

As chokepoints, these are sites that constrict or choke the flow of information, bodies and goods due to their natural and anthropogenic qualities. They are, by definition, integral yet difficult to bypass. Importantly, what happens at these sites ripples far beyond their immediate surroundings. Indeed, as Middleton’s research is demonstrating, chokepoints are sites where forces of globalization are powerfully exposed.

“Our aim is understand the human dimensions,” explained Middleton. “We are all dependent on chokepoints. Turning ethnographic attention to these sites, we aim to develop new understandings of the global flows and frictions that define the world today.”

Extreme Housing Conditions in North Carolina

Many North Carolina communities are experiencing an affordable housing crisis, which is particularly severe for those who rent. This report examines severe housing cost burden, overcrowding and substandard housing conditions among renters in the state. It identifies areas in our state with extreme housing needs, defined as having relatively high levels of at least two of the following three indicators: severe housing cost burden, overcrowding and the lack of complete kitchen and bathroom facilities.

Interactive Map

In addition to the report, an interactive map of Extreme Housing Conditions in North Carolina can be found by clicking on the map above.

Among the report’s findings:

  • Census tracts with extreme housing conditions were found in 46 of North Carolina’s 100 counties and in all three geographic regions.
  • As of 2013, more than 377,000, or 28.2 percent, of the State’s rental households experienced severe cost burdens, were overcrowded or lacked critical facilities.
  • The number of severely cost-burdened households increased by 53,737 or 22.5 percent between 2008 and 2013.
  • In eight census tracts, over 60 percent of renter households were severely cost burdened, with the highest percentage being 77.4 percent in a Wake County tract.
  • The number of overcrowded households increased by 20,437, or 45.4 percent, between 2008 and 2013.
  • In six census tracts, over 30 percent of renter households were overcrowded, with the highest rate being 53 percent in a Wake County tract.

The report’s findings indicate that additional efforts are needed to improve housing conditions, reduce overcrowding, and lessen the housing cost burdens of renters in North Carolina. Without decent and affordable housing it is difficult for many families in the state to lead happy and productive lives. These housing problems also increase public health care costs and reliance on social support programs and lower productivity. The combined efforts of state and local governments are needed to reverse the negative trends in housing affordability and overcrowding and improve the quality of life and economic productivity of North Carolinians.

The executive summary can be found here and the full report can be found here.

In addition to the report, an interactive map for Extreme Housing Conditions in North Carolina can be found here.

Local Entrepreneurship Workshop in Italy

On March 13-14, 2017, two representatives from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will take part in a CURS-supported international workshop in Trento, Italy on The Realm of Entrepreneurship: The Local Perspective. The workshop will highlight the nature and role of entrepreneurship in modern developed and emerging economies, and its relation to governments, universities and the nonprofit sector.

Buck Goldstein

Buck Goldstein

It aims to explain the growth and performance of economies and resilience or vulnerability to crisis with an emphasis on innovation processes and patterns at the local level and in small- and medium-sized enterprises.

University Entrepreneur in Residence Buck Goldstein, professor of the practice in the Department of Economics at UNC-Chapel Hill and Researcher Mary Donegan from UNC-Chapel Hill’s Center for Community Capital will attend. Goldstein will present on “Universities as Vehicles for Local Innovation and Economic Development” with Donegan speaking on “Innovation from the Edge: Universities, Entrepreneurship and the Rise of Localism.”

The workshop will take a comparative approach in looking at entrepreneurship and its interplay with governance and the generation of knowledge by focusing on three distinct international cases: a dominant emerging economy (China), a developed independent market economy (United States) and integrated developed market economies – both resilient and vulnerable – within the Eurozone common currency area.

Mary Donegal

Mary Donegan

Partners in this effort include: the DELoS (Development Economics and Local Systems) Ph.D. program, Doctoral School of Social Sciences, Department of Economics and Management and School in Social Sciences, University of Trento; the Department of Economics and Business Sciences, University of Florence; the Department of City & Regional Planning and Center for Urban and Regional Studies, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and the School of Economics and Centre for Research of Private Economy, Zhejiang University.

This workshop, at the University of Trento in Italy, is the first of three, to be followed by future events hosted in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and Zhejiang, China.

Are Chinese households becoming more resilient to climate change? Large-sample evidence from the China Health and Nutrition Survey

Clark Gray

Clark Gray

The UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies presents:

A Brown Bag Lunch Seminar by Clark Gray, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Geography, UNC-Chapel Hill

Reading Room, New East
Friday, March 3, 2017, 12:30-1:45 PM

Dr. Gray will present ongoing research with collaborators on the consequences of climate variability for human health and internal migration in China. This work reveals that heat stress can contribute to undernutrition and displace migrants, but that these effects have declined over time as China has developed and urbanized. The implications of these results for climate adaptation will be discussed.

http://www.josefschulz.de/

Photo: Josef Schulz http://www.josefschulz.de/

Working with In-country Chinese Migrant and Low Income Families: Creating and Sustaining Partnerships on the Other Side of the Earth

Mimi Chapman

Mimi Chapman

The UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies presents:

A Brown Bag Lunch Seminar by Mimi Chapman, Ph.D.
Professor, UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work

Reading Room, New East
Friday, February 24, 2017, 12:30-1:45 PM
Postponed until a later date. Please check back for an update.
Free

Since 2010, Professor Mimi Chapman of the UNC School of Social Work and Professor Meihua Zhu of the East China University of Science and Technology have been working together to understand and address the needs of in-country migrant families and low income families in Shanghai, China. Frequent policy changes in China have made this work challenging and ever-evolving. This talk will describe their work thus far, discuss findings, and plans for future development.

Chapman_China

Practice of Urban Revival in Shanghai, China

CURS, the Department of City and Regional Planning, and the Program on Chinese Cities presents:

Practice of Urban Revival in Shanghai, China

Gu XiaokunA Brown Bag Lunch Seminar by Gu Xiaokun, Visiting Scholar at the Center for Urban & Regional Studies.

Reading Room, New East
Thursday, February 2, 2017, 12:30-1:45PM

Shanghai has a long history of urban revival, dating back to the 19th century. As the first city in China committed to limiting the total amount of land allocated for construction, Shanghai plays a critical role in informing urban planning and development in China. In her presentation, Dr. Gu will discuss the history of urban revival in Shanghai, highlight several case studies, outline the main policy tools used, and identify new trends in urban revival since 2015.

Biography: Gu Xiaokun is a visiting scholar at the Center for Urban and Regional Studies. She received her Ph.D. at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences. She was an associate professor at the School of Urban and Regional Planning in Zhejiang Gongshang University from 2008 to 2014. Currently, she is an associate researcher at the Institute of New Rural Development in Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Dr. Gu’s research interests including urban and rural planning, land use policy and rural development, and urban revival.

Urban 2 Point 0 Looks at Job Growth in NC

urban2-0In a new series, Urban 2 Point 0 will look at how the geography of jobs across the state has shifted since 1990, both overall and for specific industries. The first post of this series examines total private-sector job changes between 1990 and 2015, and in the upcoming weeks we’ll examine how jobs have changed across specific industries.

North Carolina is one of the fastest-growing states in the U.S. It has added nearly 750,000 private-sector jobs since 1990, and its population recently eclipsed the 10 million mark. This job growth hasn’t touched all parts of the state, though: half of it has occurred in only two counties, and over one-third of the state’s counties have actually lost jobs over the past 25 years.

Urban 2 Point 0 focuses on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, with easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.