Local Entrepreneurship Workshop in Italy

On March 13-14, 2017, two representatives from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will take part in a CURS-supported international workshop in Trento, Italy on The Realm of Entrepreneurship: The Local Perspective. The workshop will highlight the nature and role of entrepreneurship in modern developed and emerging economies, and its relation to governments, universities and the nonprofit sector.

Buck Goldstein

Buck Goldstein

It aims to explain the growth and performance of economies and resilience or vulnerability to crisis with an emphasis on innovation processes and patterns at the local level and in small- and medium-sized enterprises.

University Entrepreneur in Residence Buck Goldstein, professor of the practice in the Department of Economics at UNC-Chapel Hill and Researcher Mary Donegan from UNC-Chapel Hill’s Center for Community Capital will attend. Goldstein will present on “Universities as Vehicles for Local Innovation and Economic Development” with Donegan speaking on “Innovation from the Edge: Universities, Entrepreneurship and the Rise of Localism.”

The workshop will take a comparative approach in looking at entrepreneurship and its interplay with governance and the generation of knowledge by focusing on three distinct international cases: a dominant emerging economy (China), a developed independent market economy (United States) and integrated developed market economies – both resilient and vulnerable – within the Eurozone common currency area.

Mary Donegal

Mary Donegan

Partners in this effort include: the DELoS (Development Economics and Local Systems) Ph.D. program, Doctoral School of Social Sciences, Department of Economics and Management and School in Social Sciences, University of Trento; the Department of Economics and Business Sciences, University of Florence; the Department of City & Regional Planning and Center for Urban and Regional Studies, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and the School of Economics and Centre for Research of Private Economy, Zhejiang University.

This workshop, at the University of Trento in Italy, is the first of three, to be followed by future events hosted in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and Zhejiang, China.

Are Chinese households becoming more resilient to climate change? Large-sample evidence from the China Health and Nutrition Survey

Clark Gray

Clark Gray

The UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies presents:

A Brown Bag Lunch Seminar by Clark Gray, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Geography, UNC-Chapel Hill

Reading Room, New East
Friday, March 3, 2017, 12:30-1:45 PM

Dr. Gray will present ongoing research with collaborators on the consequences of climate variability for human health and internal migration in China. This work reveals that heat stress can contribute to undernutrition and displace migrants, but that these effects have declined over time as China has developed and urbanized. The implications of these results for climate adaptation will be discussed.

http://www.josefschulz.de/

Photo: Josef Schulz http://www.josefschulz.de/

Practice of Urban Revival in Shanghai, China

CURS, the Department of City and Regional Planning, and the Program on Chinese Cities presents:

Practice of Urban Revival in Shanghai, China

Gu XiaokunA Brown Bag Lunch Seminar by Gu Xiaokun, Visiting Scholar at the Center for Urban & Regional Studies.

Reading Room, New East
Thursday, February 2, 2017, 12:30-1:45PM

Shanghai has a long history of urban revival, dating back to the 19th century. As the first city in China committed to limiting the total amount of land allocated for construction, Shanghai plays a critical role in informing urban planning and development in China. In her presentation, Dr. Gu will discuss the history of urban revival in Shanghai, highlight several case studies, outline the main policy tools used, and identify new trends in urban revival since 2015.

Biography: Gu Xiaokun is a visiting scholar at the Center for Urban and Regional Studies. She received her Ph.D. at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences. She was an associate professor at the School of Urban and Regional Planning in Zhejiang Gongshang University from 2008 to 2014. Currently, she is an associate researcher at the Institute of New Rural Development in Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Dr. Gu’s research interests including urban and rural planning, land use policy and rural development, and urban revival.

Urban 2 Point 0 Looks at Job Growth in NC

urban2-0In a new series, Urban 2 Point 0 will look at how the geography of jobs across the state has shifted since 1990, both overall and for specific industries. The first post of this series examines total private-sector job changes between 1990 and 2015, and in the upcoming weeks we’ll examine how jobs have changed across specific industries.

North Carolina is one of the fastest-growing states in the U.S. It has added nearly 750,000 private-sector jobs since 1990, and its population recently eclipsed the 10 million mark. This job growth hasn’t touched all parts of the state, though: half of it has occurred in only two counties, and over one-third of the state’s counties have actually lost jobs over the past 25 years.

Urban 2 Point 0 focuses on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, with easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.

Urban 2 Point 0 Examines the Triad

urban2-0In the final post of the Urban 2 Point 0 series on transportation affordability across North Carolina’s three largest metro areas, we look at the Triad region. As we’ve seen in the Triangle and Charlotte, the Triad’s sprawling nature means that many low-income residents spend a large portion of their income on transportation.

This series of posts examined the issue of mixed-income neighborhoods and income inequality in North Carolina’s three largest metro areas: Charlotte, the Triangle (Raleigh-Durham), and the Triad (Greensboro and Winston-Salem). We’ll also publish posts on affordable housing demand, how cities have recovered from the Great Recession, how high-tech industries have disbursed throughout the state, and how demographics can predict the 2016 primary election results.

Urban 2 Point 0 focuses on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, with easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.

Professor Zhendong Luo to Give Talk on New Urbanization in China

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Zhendong Luo, an associate professor at Nanjing University and a visiting scholar at CURS’ Program on Chinese Cities, will give a talk entitled “New Urbanization in China from the Bottom Up: The Characteristic Mechanisms & Trends of Rural Urbanization Driven by E-Commerce.” He will speak from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in New East‘s Reading Room this Thursday, April 7. The talk is free, and light refreshments will be served.

Rural urbanization driven by e-commerce is a relatively new process in China. This process is systematically restructuring rural economic, social, and spatial environments, influencing the non-agricultural transformation of employment and sparking comprehensive modernization of country life and intensive urbanization of rural land. The advantages of rural areas—including low-cost entrepreneurial environments, specialty agricultural products, and local non-agricultural industry—and advances in e-commerce allow rural areas to overcome geographic constraints and join the national and global economy.

In his talk, Professor Luo will discuss these changes and how the importance of the capital and knowledge heading to the countryside help support rural sustainable development. For more information, please contact Todd Owen, CURS’ Associate Director, at towen@email.unc.edu.

CURS Researchers Present at Urban Affairs Association Conference

Kirstin Frescoln presenting her research at the Urban Affairs Association conference in San Diego.

Kirstin Frescoln presenting her research at the Urban Affairs Association conference in San Diego.

CURS Researchers Michael Webb and Kirstin Frescoln presented their research at the Urban Affairs Association conference in San Diego last week.

Kirstin’s paper was titled “I Was Scared Over There – Family Well-being After Relocation from a Distressed Public Housing Development.” Her presentation examined how relocation from the Charlotte Housing Authority’s Boulevard Homes development impacted residents’ health and well-being [link to final boulevard report]

Michael’s paper was titled “Counselors or Craigslist? Relationships Between Housing Search Resources and Voucher Holders’ Neighborhood Outcomes.” He used data from our survey of the Charlotte Housing Authority’s Section 8 residents to examine whether residents who relied on counseling services, websites (like SocialServe or Craigslist), friends or family, or just “driving around” moved to higher-quality neighborhoods. You can view his presentation here.

CURS Director Bill Rohe was also at the conference, and led two roundtable discussions – one on the meaning of “self-sufficiency” in housing programs, and another on issues related to leading university-based urban research centers.

CURS Launches Blog, Urban 2 Point 0

urban2-0CURS is thrilled to announce the launch of our new blog, Urban 2 Point 0. Focusing on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, Urban 2 Point 0 presents easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Our first series of posts examines the issue of mixed-income neighborhoods and income inequality in North Carolina’s three largest metro areas: Charlotte, the Triangle (Raleigh-Durham), and the Triad (Greensboro and Winston-Salem). We’ll also publish posts on affordable housing demand, how cities have recovered from the Great Recession, how high-tech industries have disbursed throughout the state, and how demographics can predict the 2016 primary election results.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.