Extreme Housing Conditions in North Carolina

Many North Carolina communities are experiencing an affordable housing crisis, which is particularly severe for those who rent. This report examines severe housing cost burden, overcrowding and substandard housing conditions among renters in the state. It identifies areas in our state with extreme housing needs, defined as having relatively high levels of at least two of the following three indicators: severe housing cost burden, overcrowding and the lack of complete kitchen and bathroom facilities.

Interactive Map

In addition to the report, an interactive map of Extreme Housing Conditions in North Carolina can be found by clicking on the map above.

Among the report’s findings:

  • Census tracts with extreme housing conditions were found in 46 of North Carolina’s 100 counties and in all three geographic regions.
  • As of 2013, more than 377,000, or 28.2 percent, of the State’s rental households experienced severe cost burdens, were overcrowded or lacked critical facilities.
  • The number of severely cost-burdened households increased by 53,737 or 22.5 percent between 2008 and 2013.
  • In eight census tracts, over 60 percent of renter households were severely cost burdened, with the highest percentage being 77.4 percent in a Wake County tract.
  • The number of overcrowded households increased by 20,437, or 45.4 percent, between 2008 and 2013.
  • In six census tracts, over 30 percent of renter households were overcrowded, with the highest rate being 53 percent in a Wake County tract.

The report’s findings indicate that additional efforts are needed to improve housing conditions, reduce overcrowding, and lessen the housing cost burdens of renters in North Carolina. Without decent and affordable housing it is difficult for many families in the state to lead happy and productive lives. These housing problems also increase public health care costs and reliance on social support programs and lower productivity. The combined efforts of state and local governments are needed to reverse the negative trends in housing affordability and overcrowding and improve the quality of life and economic productivity of North Carolinians.

The executive summary can be found here and the full report can be found here.

In addition to the report, an interactive map for Extreme Housing Conditions in North Carolina can be found here.

Urban 2 Point 0 Looks at Job Growth in NC

urban2-0In a new series, Urban 2 Point 0 will look at how the geography of jobs across the state has shifted since 1990, both overall and for specific industries. The first post of this series examines total private-sector job changes between 1990 and 2015, and in the upcoming weeks we’ll examine how jobs have changed across specific industries.

North Carolina is one of the fastest-growing states in the U.S. It has added nearly 750,000 private-sector jobs since 1990, and its population recently eclipsed the 10 million mark. This job growth hasn’t touched all parts of the state, though: half of it has occurred in only two counties, and over one-third of the state’s counties have actually lost jobs over the past 25 years.

Urban 2 Point 0 focuses on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, with easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.

Urban 2 Point 0 Examines the Triad

urban2-0In the final post of the Urban 2 Point 0 series on transportation affordability across North Carolina’s three largest metro areas, we look at the Triad region. As we’ve seen in the Triangle and Charlotte, the Triad’s sprawling nature means that many low-income residents spend a large portion of their income on transportation.

This series of posts examined the issue of mixed-income neighborhoods and income inequality in North Carolina’s three largest metro areas: Charlotte, the Triangle (Raleigh-Durham), and the Triad (Greensboro and Winston-Salem). We’ll also publish posts on affordable housing demand, how cities have recovered from the Great Recession, how high-tech industries have disbursed throughout the state, and how demographics can predict the 2016 primary election results.

Urban 2 Point 0 focuses on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, with easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.

CURS Launches Blog, Urban 2 Point 0

urban2-0CURS is thrilled to announce the launch of our new blog, Urban 2 Point 0. Focusing on urban issues relevant to North Carolina and beyond, Urban 2 Point 0 presents easily digestible data analysis complemented by infographics, maps, and other visuals.

Our first series of posts examines the issue of mixed-income neighborhoods and income inequality in North Carolina’s three largest metro areas: Charlotte, the Triangle (Raleigh-Durham), and the Triad (Greensboro and Winston-Salem). We’ll also publish posts on affordable housing demand, how cities have recovered from the Great Recession, how high-tech industries have disbursed throughout the state, and how demographics can predict the 2016 primary election results.

Urban 2 Point 0 is edited by CURS researcher Michael Webb and managed by public communications specialist Andy Berner. If you’re interested in contributing a post to the blog, please contact Michael at mdwebb@unc.edu.